Skoda yeti timing belt teambhp

By Avech3721 February, in Skoda Yeti. Apologies to all if this topic has been discussed on other threads but I am a newbie to this site My question to you all is quite simply, should I replace the belt at such a low mileage? I am led to believe that some recommendations originating from other European Skoda 'authorities' make reference to mileage only with no reference to a time based replacement trigger but I have no first hand evidence of this.

Any comments please? Replace it and the water pump as well.

skoda yeti timing belt teambhp

One major factor on belt wear is the number of cold starts, so a 4 year old car with say k miles is possible less vulnerable to a belt snap than a 5 year old car with 10k miles.

We had a citroen Picasso, 1. Of course we never changed it. I understood rightly or wrongly, that it was more mileage related than time. But that depends on the manufacturer. We did a risk assessment, and since the car was old and not worth a great deal, we were able to take a chance. However with a young car with such a low mileage, you have to consider the cost going forward, and spread the cost over the next few years that you want to keep it.

So budget the cost going forward, over the next five years, then the price doesn't look that bad. Not to mention that you are already loosing approx. That had a fixed cambelt replacement age of 4 years regardless of mileage. Changed Cambeltwater pump. Garage owner works mainly on Taxi's and has never experienced a belt failure on a Skoda. I endorse all of the comments posted which repeatedly warn of the consequences of gambling if it does fail.

Not worth the risk. I also had to replace front discs inner face badly corroded and pads at 32K which I thought was poor. I know all the arguments against low annual diesel mileage ownership but like you enjoy the engine and feel good factor of seeing 50mpg on occasional long runs. I had a belt break on a Vauxhall Viva GT about 40 years ago it did not do any damage to the engine then.

I would not risk it now change it is worth the expense.Re: Case of a snapped timing belt in a Skoda Yeti. Originally Posted by dip27in.

Idea of the thread was to inculcate the idea of "listening to your car and do it yourself" rather than following a blind advise of Manufacturers with financial interest.

It isnt a rocket science unless you make it look like one. I can flood this thread with umpteen number of examples on cars I own, especially a Vrs and E46, which hasn't seen a workshop till date. If I drill down to the basic reason why it failed, probably there has been a design failure in this batch of yeti starting from to which was evident from the Tensioner bearing design on later model.

The spring adjusting mechanism probably was placed too close without keeping in mind of the repeated heating and cooling factor of a cramped engine, especially in Indian scenario.

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skoda yeti timing belt teambhp

New Topics. Mark Forums Read. Page 2 of 2. Thread Tools. Re: Case of a snapped timing belt in a Skoda Yeti Quote: Originally Posted by dip27in Idea of the thread was to inculcate the idea of "listening to your car and do it yourself" rather than following a blind advise of Manufacturers with financial interest. Re: Case of a snapped timing belt in a Skoda Yeti Quote: Originally Posted by dip27in If I drill down to the basic reason why it failed, probably there has been a design failure in this batch of yeti starting from to which was evident from the Tensioner bearing design on later model.Hello all, I have a Skoda Yeti with a 1.

Many Thanks. That suggests your mechanic doesn't know a lot about VAG's. There has been a problem with the chain driven 1. Modern cam belts are very different to the old ones and are much less of a problem. Also make sure an original oil filter is fitted and ensure old rubber seal has been removed and the filter is not overtightened!

He did say they are about the same he said about the chain guide needs to be changed he said if the engine sounds like the tappets are making a noise it will be the chain guide I did check if there was a recall on my car and it said know recall.

There was a TPI. Technical Product Information. You need to be a member in order to leave a comment. Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy! Already have an account? Sign in here. By black vtr. By tonyrans. By Nosnx. By Big Lee. Please note the following important links Terms of Use. We have a comprehensive Privacy Policy.

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better.By kaasboer093 February, in Skoda Yeti. I am currently considering a 2. The dealer says that the belt was never changed, since this only has to be done every Isn't there a time interval as well?

That would be really useful Don't know about the 2. Just had mine done; the dealer contacted me as the car was approaching 5 years old.

It was on 65k miles. VAG Group seem to change cam belts by age rather than mileage. Back inwith my Seat Altea it was after 4 years. It's now 5 years for my Yeti 2. My wife's fabia 1.

Part exchanged it at 13 years old without touching it again. As after 3 years the warranty has gone it is really up to the owner as to the risk he will take.

Some makes go on mileage and ignore age so most normal owners would never have to change it. You need to be a member in order to leave a comment. Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy! Already have an account? Sign in here. By black vtr. By tonyrans. By Nosnx. By Big Lee. Please note the following important links Terms of Use. We have a comprehensive Privacy Policy.

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Vw Polo/Up 1.0 MPi wymiana paska rozrządu Silnik CHYB TIMING BELT REPLACEMENT

You can adjust your cookie settingsotherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. Cam belt interval By kaasboer093 February, in Skoda Yeti.

Recommended Posts. Posted 3 February, Share this post Link to post Share on other sites. Posted 3 February, edited. Edited 3 February, by kaasboer Posted 5 February, Yes - better safe than sorry. I'd rather do this early than bear the consequences of belt failure! Obviously as said above though, it's a risk, but if the car is worth very little at belt change two and you're well under mileage, you have to decide how you personally feel and cost vs return etc.

I thought the reccommendation was to inspect after 5 years, not replace. My 5 year old car has only done miles. Should I change the belt now? What's involved in an inspection? Does the mechanic simply check the belt for cracks or do they check tensioners and the like? Given that my manual says that it should last until ,km without a time limit I'm wondering why Skoda added the time limit afterwards.

Clearly the belts were designed to last such an amount of mileage. That said, I've heard the water pumps go long before the k mark! I'm puzzled what the conditions are in the UK that in the opinion of Skoda UK reduce the life of the cambelt?

For Petrol 1. The waterpump is separate to the cambelt, at the other end of the engine, with a separate belt - same inspection interval. Mines was specified to 5 years or k miles, whichever came first. I called Skoda to get this confirmed as it was nowhere on the documents that came with the car. What really bothers me is armchair experts come on here and set down the law for others, but never produce evidence.

You want documentation? Like most things, Skoda general info is lacking and the cambelt is no diffferent, but I think we can all agree that whatever VW, Audi and SEAT say will also apply to Skoda given it's the same mechanics, same engine, same parts, same oils etc.

This may need to be changed sooner for high mileage drivers. How often should a cambelt be changed? The maximum recommended mileage interval for a cambelt change is stated in your vehicle handbook varies depending on model, year and engine type. We recommend your cambelt is changed every five years or recommended mileage, whichever occurs soonest.

When you use your car, your cambelt will stretch and eventually break if it is not changed. It is recommended that you change your cambelt every 40, miles. Alternatively, your handbook should tell you the suggested mileage from the manufacturer that you should change your cambelt. Also, if you are unsure about whether or not it is time to replace your cambelt, take it to one of these places, and they will be able to tell you whether or not it is time for a change.

Noises — Do you hear high pitched noise when you start your vehicle? If you hear a squelling or rattling noise from your engine you cambelt may need replacing. Starting Issues — If your cambelt has snapped the engine will not be in sync, the cam shaft doesnt rotate as the crankshaft turns so the engune will fail to start.

Visual Checks — When you lift the hood and check the cambelt certain features can be higlighted pointing toward the need for a camebelt change. If the cambelt is beginning to fray or crack and if the underside of the belt is starting to appear glazed or glossy these are signs of a worn cambelt thaat needs replacing.

On many models, the water pump is run by the cambelt as it pumps and ciculates coolant around the engine to keep the engine running at the correct temperature. Therefore replacing the water pump at the same time as the cambelt reduces the risk of the pump failing.View My Garage. Originally Posted by deepakvaid. For me its easy as I stay in Delhi and there are couple of dealer.

Originally Posted by abbey4u. Thanks Deepak. Can you share the number of Rahul motor.

Case of a snapped timing belt in a Skoda Yeti

Also does this replacement require removing dash? I am in Hyderabad now and if we can identify the motor by vin, it will make it easy to source. Hello Yetizens! Need your advice.

I have a Yeti Elegance that is now hitting 90K. It's served me well so far: have made a number of gruelling trips to Ladakh, Spiti and the Sach Pass. Last year, my clutch gave way and I had to replace the entire clutch system. This year, my service guy tells me that the suspension needs to be replaced and that the timing belt and brake pads are also due for replacement. Does anyone know what else I can expect to have to change as the Yeti approaches K?

Also, I know this has been asked before, but is there a reliable Skoda workshop in North India? Thanks in advance! Originally Posted by yetizing. The following 4 BHPians Thank Steeroid for this useful post: autoskoolldigitalnirvanamh09adyetizing. Last edited by Behemoth : 10th April at Dear BHPains Need some expert advice I love the car.

Originally Posted by darora. The following 2 BHPians Thank krish3 for this useful post: daroradigitalnirvana. I bought my Yeti in Dec I have clocked ,kms.View My Garage. Case of a snapped timing belt in a Skoda Yeti. Have you heard the story about two elderly couples, who completed fifty years of their marriage, and were being interviewed by a reporter?

The news guy asked them, "How did you manage to stay married for so long? I shall tell you why. My association with cars started long back, when I was in my childhood. My first memory of a car is of a Fiat Millicento, riding with my father. We also had a '67 D, which gave up her engine after running for about 2.

It was repaired at our home and ran another 40K kilometers before being sold. Currently I have a '88 Premiere Padmini which is going strong at 1. The European siblings are doing equally good, which consist of one of the most hated and equally coveted Skoda vrs.

So, in a way I was brought up in a culture of maintaining without any Authorised workshop support and loving cars. This went on in the modern age of Indian Car scene as well, for a different reason. As the Indian automotive market became open back in '90s, and multiple manufacturers came in, the common Indian car buyer expected more choice, lesser price and a little more customer-centric behavior. Those things did happen, but along with that came the shrewdness of the foreign players as well.

The manufacturers tried to milk the customers through a thousand different means. Car sale margins dropped and car servicing became the next best revenue channel. Extended warranties and AMCs became a minefield of hidden clauses and exclusions, a simple assurance document became a meticulously drafted list of items which can not fail, and are therefore covered.

Another notorious practice is the one of replacing parts as a whole, even when there is an opportunity of fixing or changing a child part. I can share umpteen example but it wont be wise to let down the blind trust of authorised workshops of India.

Also, I feel as a whole the car maintenance philosophy became lazy, the servicing teams just thinking 'what' to replace a failing part instead of asking 'why' and trying to identify the root cause of the problem. This habit of them has forced me to shy away from servicing my cars at service centers. I try to maintain them at my home, with the best of my limited knowledge, understanding and a whole lot of love. I profusely thank my stars that doctors cant change body parts, else we would not have been left of anything we were born with.

If you remember the movie Rush, there was a dialogue by Niki Lauda. It really gives me a thrill, a taste of the hunt, to identify the why, the what and the where of the problem by looking, feeling or hearing troublesome car. This is one such case of a car, a Skoda Yeti. It belongs to a friend of a BHPian. Popped the hood, and immediately noticed this: Looks like a simple belt failure, which had taken a few other things with it.

The belt damaged the camshaft position sensor as well. However, on closer inspection one could see that the belt was in a fairly okay, if not good, shape. So why would a belt with quite a few thousand kilometers still to go snap suddenly?

On deeper inspection, the rogue part was found out to be the belt tensioner. While the engine was running, the tensioner gave up, and the slacked belt was pulled by the running engine causing the snap.

skoda yeti timing belt teambhp

The Yeti has the belt mechanism encased in a compartment, therefore the loosened belt had nowhere to go, and had damaged a few other components in the same chamber. The Timing tension Spring was totally damaged. It failed to hold the belt in place, which according to my finding should be the main reason for this catastrophic failure.

The engine compartment of this particular car is very crowded, which made the disassembly a tiresome job. Had started working on this at 3 in the afternoon, and was done by 7 in the evening. The turbo, disassembled.


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